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How Better Keyword Research Gets You Better SEO Results?

It would seem that Google was doing its best to negate keywords. In 2011, the Panda update attacked poor quality content, followed up by Penguin in 2012, which aggressively went after sites using black-hat keyword and link techniques.

In 2013, Google introduced an in-depth article into its search returns, and then later that same year released Hummingbird, which made the search engine understand more than simple words but full sentences.
Build your personal SEO with Building A Keyword Narrative
By the end of 2013, keyword data was no longer showing up in Google Analytics.

Keywords are not dead, despite all of this.

What Google is trying to do is provide context to what users are searching for instead of simply matching up the words they type into the search engine.

When a person types “calories banana”, Google wants to return pages that answer the question “how many calories are in a banana”, which is most likely what the person wanted to know, instead of pages that match the individual words of “calories” or “banana.”

And, of course, Google even provides SemRush [
RECOMMENDED], a keyword planning tool. 

We can’t talk about keywords without mentioning it.

Clearly, keywords still matter to Google.

Finding relevant keywords
This newly revamped Google Keyword Planner tool can provide you with traffic-related data, traffic forecasts, geo-targeted research, new keyword ideas, and much more.

While the tool is quite extensive and offers you a lot of data, there are two important functions that make it useful for content marketers.

Keyword Planner will return a similar results page no matter how you use the tool.

You’ll see how often a keyword is searched for (“Avg. monthly searches”) and related search trends (click on the small graph next to “Avg. monthly searches”).

If you have a keyword and you’re not sure how to incorporate it into a post or want additional ideas, a nice little shortcut is to drop the keyword into a plain Google search. 

Jump down to the bottom and look at the recommended searches.

You’ll see the phrases people are using in a search that is related to that keyword.

Using keyword planning in your content marketing will help you keep a narrow focus on a topic, and it will also help you discover topics that are of interest to your audience that you might not have known.

Putting Your Keywords To Work.
Keyword research won’t do any good if you don’t put those keywords to work.

Use them in planning. Now that you have a list of suggested keywords, you ought to keep it handy.
Create a list or spreadsheet of the keywords that you discover through research.

Use it when you plan topics on your editorial calendar.

Use them in multiple places. Your keywords should be found in the headline, URL (if possible), body content, and Meta description.

Use them to stay focused. Keywords are not just a search engine gimmick.

In a way, they help you answer the question of what you’re trying to achieve with your content before you sit down to writing it.

They force you to consider carefully what and how you write.

The important thing here is to make certain that you do something with those keywords, particularly in the planning of your content.

The keywords should come first.

They shouldn’t be an afterthought that you load into an already planned or finished post if you want the post to flow naturally around the keywords and phrases you’ve discovered.

Building A Keyword Narrative.
SemRush suggests that you take keywords even further and build a keyword narrative that goes beyond single pieces of content and affects your entire content approach.

Running on the assumption that you’ve gotten to know your audience through personas, and that you know what types of content appeal to each of those persona groups, you can do keyword research around the themes they prefer.

It’s a kind of reverse approach; instead of your keywords telling you what content to create, your content is telling you what keywords to research.

By understanding what content will have the most potential monthly traffic based on that keyword research, you can organize your editorial calendar accordingly.

You would devote more content to the potentially higher-traffic topics.

Essentially, you use what you already know about your audience, and do some SEO research.
How Better Keyword Research Gets You Better SEO Results?

Good luck!

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How Better Keyword Research Gets You Better SEO Results? Reviewed by MURLI on December 07, 2018 Rating: 5

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